Coco husk soil

For urban gardeners, one key question is how to get plants, soil and pot from store to house. I buy many of my plants from small shops that are on my way from the train station to my apartment. Sometimes I bike to a DIY big box store called Shimatchu, and use a combination of large backpack and balancing plants in plastic bags across my handle bars.

Recently I discovered coconut husk as a soil. It’s sold at a wonderful Kichijoji indoor growing shop called Essence. Made entirely of husk, it recycles what would otherwise be waste, and it seems to be a high quality organic soil. Even better, it is sold dehydrated, so it is very light weight for transportation from shop to home.

I have bought three blocks (also called tampons) that make 11 liters when hydrated. Nakata-san of Essence recommended blending it 3-1-1 with perlite and vermiculite, which are also very light weight and low cost. When blended it makes about two regular sized buckets of soil.

I also used coco husk soil in small disks that expand with water to form seedling starters wrapped in a simple rope pouch.

You can see that my morning glory seeds were the first to sprout.

I also bought this funny Gro-Pot, a thick plastic bag with coco husk that you hydrate and plant directly into, as if it were a flower pot. I’ve put a sunflower in my Gro-Pot (bought for 500 yen, just over $5 from a local flower shop). Both the Gro-Pot and the coconut husk block are from U-Gro.

For the coco husk mix, I used another light weight new idea: Smartpots, a soft-side fabric container that claims to be better than plastic and clay containers, is super easy to carry and store. The makers claim that these polypropylene containers aerate and air prune the roots. When you buy the smartpots, they come folded up, which is very convenient.

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4 comments

  1. Thanks for the wonderful tips. I’ve been thinking of starting a small garden on my balcony. With such great materials out there I have no excuse not to start now!

    Do you have any recommendations for balcony-friendly plants? I live on the twelfth floor of my Tokyo apartment and get quite a bit of wind.

    1. I recommend a few things for novice gardeners. First, think about what you want: herbs, flowers, privacy, greenery, vegetables? Second, think about how much maintenance you can provide. Third, look at what your neighbors are doing, people with similar constraints and opportunities (including the direction your balcony faces). Lastly, be prepared for trial and error: some things will succeed and others won’t. Experiment! Please let me know how your new garden works out. Enjoy!

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