Hanazono Shrine

First step, toss your old rake in this big pile

recycle_kumade_tori_no_ichi_hanazono 始めに、去年の熊手をここに投げています。そこ大きい熊手は高かったそうです。 Last year’s rake must have cost hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. That’s the price of good luck. pile_recycle_kumade_tori_no_ichi_hanazono

Between Jonathans and Tokyo Daihanten chain restaurants

lanterns_tori_no_ichi_hanazono

二つのチェイン・レストランの間で、酉の市の提灯が見えます。新宿の花園神社です。

The rows of lanterns signal Tori no Ichi is happening. I’ll post some photos of my favorite festival at Shinjuku’s Hanazono shrine.

Saying a quiet prayer for deceased loved one at Hanazono shrine

hanazono_shrine_winter_prayer_ros
昼に花園神社で、亡くなってしまった人に静かに祈りました。大事な人でした。天気は寒くて、空が青かったです。

 

A mid-day visit to Hanazono shrine in Shinjuku to say a silent prayer for Ros. RIP. Blue sky on a chilly winter day.

Tree lined walking path in Shinjuku is magical

There are many small creeks in Tokyo that have been turned into pedestrian paths. In my neighborhood, they are modestly landscaped. In Shinjuku, there’s Shinjuku Yuhodo Koen Shiki no Machi (新宿遊歩道公園四季の道), an amazing green corridor with mature trees between the department stores of San Chome, Hanazono Shrine, the packed bars of Golden Gai, and Kabukicho.

Oddly, my very detailed Tokyo City Atlas does not include the path’s name. It’s easy to miss it, but once inside it feels like a magical passageway, full of life during the day and at night. Green corridors take up minimal space, and are perhaps more useful than small parks since provide a path between places.