railway

Sumida river sparkles at night. Is Tokyo best experienced by dark?

日中より、夜の東京のほうがきれいですね。国技館を出て、橋を渡るときに見える隅田川や神田川やスカイツリーはロマンチックな感じがあります。

Tokyo looks more magical at night. Walking across the Sumida River after seeing a sumo tournament, we admired the retro modern view of the bridges, elevated freeways, railway tracks, and inky black river. Even Sky Tree, the latest addition to this skyline, projects a futuristic image that is oddly familiar.

The green neon marks the Kanda river’s last bridge before joining the Sumida river. This river starts at Inokashira park in Kichijoji, west of where we live and winds for 26 kilometers before joining the Sumida and flowing into Tokyo Bay. A few years ago, I co-wrote an article about the Kanda river’s history and potential for new urbanism in Tokyo. You can download the 6 MB document in PDF form here.

At the bottom, you can see that there are still pleasure boats parked at the bottom of the Kanda for river dining and drinking. I’ve never been on these smaller boats.

“We do Eco” from Tokyu

"We do Eco" from Tokyu

In the subway, I noticed this striking image and cloying tag line from Tokyu. The ad talks about the importance of growing plants on buildings, and cites a hospital they are building at Oookayama station (大岡山駅).

Tokyu Group is an old-style conglomerate built around a railway company, and including other businesses that enhance the value of the transport network, including retail, real estate, construction, leisure and cultural centers.

"We do Eco" from Tokyu Hospital

Here’s Tokyu Group’s We Do Eco website.